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Pressure Management Ensures Cleaner Water
Sebokeng, South Africa

Overview


Metsi-a-Lakoa, the water utility for Sebokeng, supports an area of ±500 000 residents. About 80% of the water supplied to the area was lost to leakage, which translates to an annual water bill of approximately ZAR 150 million (US$ 20 million).

 

Deferred maintenance, resulting from a combination of low income and high unemployment, resulted in a general deterioration of the internal plumbing fittings in area, resulting in high levels of internal plumbing leakage.

 

Project Goal


The project goal was to significantly reduce water losses that caused untreated sewage to spill into local rivers.

 

** Metsi-a-Lakoa conducted a comparative study to evaluate whether an efficiency project or building a new treatment plant would be more cost-effective. They discovered that an efficiency project would be 100 times cheaper in terms of both capital and operational investment than building a new treatment plant.

 

Project Scope


To design and commission one of the largest advanced pressure management installations in the world - first phase of a long-term strategy to reduce NRW.

 

Finaincial Highlights


Metsi-a-Lekoa incurred no out-of-pocket expenses. All costs were borne by the project team, responsible for operation and maintenance of the installation for a period of 5 years, receiving a solely performance-based compensation of 15% of the reduced water purchases.

 

Results


  • Water savings: 50 million m3, which translates to more than US $20 million
  • Sewer flows entering the treatment plant reduced by 28%
  • 14,000 MWh annual energy savings, equivalent to reduced CO2 emissions of 12,000 tons/yr.
  • Reduced pressures lead to a significant reduction in the number of pipe bursts
  • Infrastructure upgrades funded by water purchase savings
  • Continuous water supply reduces risk of waterborne diseases (typhoid, cholera, etc.)

 

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